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Wit (9-Feb-2001)

Director: Mike Nichols

Writers: Margaret Edson; Emma Thompson; Mike Nichols

Keywords: Drama

NameOccupationBirthDeathKnown for
Eileen Atkins
Actor
16-Jun-1934   Co-Creator of Upstairs, Downstairs
Christopher Lloyd
Actor
22-Oct-1938   Jim Ignatowski on Taxi
Audra McDonald
Actor
3-Jul-1970   A Raisin in the Sun
Harold Pinter
Playwright
10-Oct-1930 24-Dec-2008 The Birthday Party
Emma Thompson
Actor
15-Apr-1959   Howard's End

REVIEWS

Review by Paul Penman (posted on 6-May-2007)

I viewed this film at the Collins Street, Melbourne, Australia Baptist Church last evening. I though Emma Thompson was brilliant in her leading role; especially her delivery of John Donne's poetry, where he interprets not so much the meaning of life, but the eternal meaning of death as part of God's plan for the salvation of humankind. As a freelance writer and active Christian, I found this film to be extremely powerful by reinforcing the message of the book of Revelation, especially Chapter 21, verses 1 to 4, using as a vehicle this particular Holy Sonnet(X.). The final lines of this sonnet read 'One short sleep past, we take eternally, And Death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.' This film moved me deeply, once again confirming my need to keep short accounts with God. (The book I am currently writing 'EVERY STEP OF THE WAY' follows a similar theme, using the book of John, Chapter 14, verses 6 and 7 as its foundation.) Paul Penman BA BSScHons) GradDipArts(Writing). May 7, 2007


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