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Dead Man's Walk (12-May-1996)

Director: Yves Simoneau

Writers: Larry McMurtry; Diana Ossana

From novel by: Larry McMurtry

Keywords: Western

TV miniseries.

NameOccupationBirthDeathKnown for
F. Murray Abraham
24-Oct-1939   Mozart's antagonist in Amadeus
David Arquette
8-Sep-1971   Muppets From Space
Keith Carradine
8-Aug-1949   Thieves Like Us
Brian Dennehy
9-Jul-1938   First Blood
Jennifer Garner
17-Apr-1972   Alias
Jonny Lee Miller
15-Nov-1972   Sick Boy in Trainspotting
Tim Blake Nelson
11-May-1964   O Brother, Where Art Thou?
Edward James Olmos
24-Feb-1947   Battlestar Galactica
Harry Dean Stanton
14-Jul-1926   Bathrobe-clad actor from Repo Man


Review by Cris (posted on 28-Mar-2005)

We had to watch Dead Man's Walk for my Modern Literature class. The title itself is already very interesting but I would've been hesitant to watch it on my own. After watching it, I thought this movie was astounding and funny. It's a western mainly about two Texans Rangers Woodrow F. Call and Augustus McCrae. They go on an expedition along with a few others to conquer New Mexico. On their way there, they are captured by the Mexican army. They are able to survive as long as they don't fall out of proportion by rebelling or anything related against them. A few die along the journey for disobeying or what not which is why it's called Dead Man's Walk. It is a lengthy movie but worth anyone's time. I have yet to read the novel, but I already think Larry McMurtry's work is outstanding. He's a creative writer with so much potential which is shown through this movie and also in Streets of Laredo. I highly recommend that one as well. I would definitely make Dead Man's Walk a part of my collection.

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