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The Happy Years (7-Jul-1950)

Director: William A. Wellman

Writers: Owen Johnson (based on stories by); Harry Ruskin

Keywords: Comedy

NameOccupationBirthDeathKnown for
Leon Ames
20-Jan-1902 12-Oct-1993 Character actor, a SAG founder
Scotty Beckett
4-Oct-1929 10-May-1968 Child star train wreck
Leo G. Carroll
25-Oct-1892 16-Oct-1972 Waverly on The Man From U.N.C.L.E.
George Chandler
30-Jun-1898 10-Jun-1985 Uncle Petrie on Lassie
Darryl Hickman
28-Jul-1931   The Happy Years
Dean Stockwell
5-Mar-1936   Blue Velvet


Review by anonymous (posted on 9-May-2005)

The Happy Years covers a few of the short story subjects of Owen Johnson's books, THE LAWRENCEVILLE STORIES. These stories involve the adventures of young prep school boys attending the Lawrenceville (NJ) academy. Leo G. Carroll plays the principal foe of the young students, a teacher by the name of "the Old Roman". Dean Stockwell is fairly obnoxious as the main character Dink Stover. Stover went on to to stardom at Yale, in another of Owen Johnson books. The movie is pretty tame stuff, unlike the books. In the books, the teachers and students are evenly matched and continually play mind games on each other. The stories are very well written, and are often hilarious. The story of HUNGRY SMEED is sometimes included in short story collections. The film should be so lucky. It is a washed down version of the books, and although interesting as a bit of triviata, it is not terribly well made or entertaining.

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