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The Mysterious Mr. Wong (22-Dec-1934)

Director: William Nigh

Writers: James Herbuveaux; Nina Howatt; Lew Levenson

From short story: The Twelve Coins of Confucius by Harry Stephen Keeler

Keywords: Mystery

Bela Lugosi plays a Chinese gangster intent on killing anyone who possesses gold coins of Confucius. Legend has it that the man who manages to obtain all twelve coins would have untold power, though it is never explained how all the coins ended up in San Francisco's Chinatown. Disinterested police think it is just a tong war as the bodies pile up, but reporter Jason H. Barton, played by Wallace Ford, stumbles on a laundry ticket and starts to put the puzzle together. The film suffers from an abundance of corny dialogue.

NameOccupationBirthDeathKnown for
Wallace Ford
Actor
12-Feb-1898 11-Jun-1966 A Patch of Blue
Arline Judge
Actor
21-Feb-1912 7-Feb-1974 B-Movie actress, collector of husbands
Bela Lugosi
Actor
20-Oct-1882 16-Aug-1956 Dracula

CAST

Bela Lugosi   ...   Fu Wong
Wallace Ford   ...   Jason H. Barton (reporter)
Arline Judge   ...   Peg (telephone operator)
Fred Warren   ...   Phillip Tsang
Lotus Long   ...   Moonflower (Wong's niece)
Robert Emmett O'Connor   ...   Officer McGillicuddy
Edward Peil   ...   Jen Wu
Luke Chan   ...   Professor Chan Fu (linguist)
Lee Shumway   ...   Steve Brandon (newspaper editor)
Etta Lee   ...   Lusan (Moonflower's attendant)
Ernest F. Young   ...   Chuck Roberts (reporter)

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