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Verena Fritz. State-Building: A Comparative Study of Ukraine, Lithuania, Belarus, and Russia. Central European University Press. 2007. 384pp.

Grigory Ioffe. Understanding Belarus and How Western Foreign Policy Misses the Mark. Rowman & Littlefield. 2008. 259pp.

Elena A. Korosteleva; Colin W. Lawson; Rosalind J. Marsh (editors). Contemporary Belarus: Between Democracy and Dictatorship. Routledge. 2003. 201pp.

Ann Lewis (editor). The EU & Belarus: Between Moscow and Brussels. Federal Trust for Education and Research. 2002. 429pp.

David R. Marples. Belarus: A Denationalized Nation. Taylor & Francis. 1999. 139pp.

David R. Marples. Belarus: From Soviet Rule to Nuclear Catastrophe. St. Martin's Press. 1996. 179pp.

Serhii Plokhy. The Origins of the Slavic Nations: Premodern Identities in Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus. Cambridge University Press. 2006. 379pp.

Oliver Schmidtke; Serhy Yekelchyk (editors). Europe's Last Frontier? Belarus, Moldova, and Ukraine Between Russia and the European Union. Palgrave Macmillan. 2008. 255pp.

Timothy Snyder. The Reconstruction of Nations: Poland, Ukraine, Lithuania, Belarus, 1569-1999. Yale University Press. 2003. 367pp.

Darius Staliunas. Making Russians: Meaning and Practice of Russification in Lithuania and Belarus After 1863. Rodopi. 2007. 465pp.

Jan Zaprudnik. Belarus: At a Crossroads in History. Westview Press. 1993. 278pp.

Jan Zaprudnik. Historical Dictionary of Belarus. Scarecrow Press. 1998. 299pp.

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