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International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science

ORGANIZATION

"The International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science was created in Menton in 1967, with Professors Raymond Daudel, Per-Olov Lwdin, Robert G. Parr, John A. Pople and Bernard Pullman as its founding members, under the inspiration and with the support of Professor Louis de Broglie, Nobel Laureate and Perpetual Secretary of the French Academy of Sciences, Paris."

Official Website:
http://www.iaqms.org/

Founding Date:
1967

NameOccupationBirthDeathKnown for
Louis de Broglie
Physicist
15-Aug-1892 19-Mar-1987 Discovered the wave nature of electrons
Kenichi Fukui
Chemist
4-Oct-1918 9-Jan-1998 Frontier orbitals
Roald Hoffmann
Chemist
18-Jul-1937   Woodward-Hoffmann reaction
Friedrich Hund
Physicist
4-Feb-1896 31-Mar-1997 Quantum tunneling
Martin Karplus
Chemist
15-Mar-1930   Karplus Equation
Walter Kohn
Chemist
9-Mar-1923   Density-functional theory
William Lipscomb
Chemist
9-Dec-1919 14-Apr-2011 Chemical bonding
Rudolph A. Marcus
Chemist
21-Jul-1923   Electron-transfer reactions
Robert S. Mulliken
Chemist
7-Jun-1896 31-Oct-1986 Molecular orbital theory
Linus Pauling
Chemist
28-Feb-1901 19-Aug-1994 Scientist and peacenik
John A. Pople
Chemist
31-Oct-1925 15-Mar-2004 Quantum mechanics of molecules
Edward Teller
Physicist
15-Jan-1908 9-Sep-2003 Father of the Hydrogen Bomb
John H. van Vleck
Physicist
13-Mar-1899 27-Oct-1980 Quantum theory of paramagnetism


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