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Orazio Gentileschi

AKA Orazio Lomi

Born: 1562
Birthplace: Pisa, Italy
Died: c. 1639
Location of death: London, England
Cause of death: unspecified

Gender: Male
Religion: Roman Catholic
Race or Ethnicity: White
Sexual orientation: Straight
Occupation: Painter

Nationality: Italy
Executive summary: Italian Baroque painter

Orazio Gentileschi, Italian painter, is generally named Orazio Lomi de' Gentileschi; it appears that De Gentileschi was his correct surname, Lomi being the surname which his mother had borne during her first marriage. He was born at Pisa, and studied under his half-brother Aurelio Lomi, whom in course of time he surpassed. He afterwards went to Rome, and was associated with the landscape-painter Agostino Tasi, executing the figures for the landscape backgrounds of this artist in the Palazzo Rospigliosi, and it is said in the great hall of the Quirinal Palace, although by some authorities the figures in the last-named building are ascribed to Lanfranco. His best works are "Saints Cecilia and Valerian", in the Palazzo Borghese, Rome; "David after the death of Goliath", in the Palazzo Doria, Genoa; and some works in the royal palace, Turin, noticeable for vivid and uncommon coloring. At an advanced age Gentileschi went to England at the invitation of Charles I, and he was employed in the palace at Greenwich. Vandyck included him in his portraits of a hundred illustrious men. His works generally are strong in shadow and positive in color. Gentileschi was greatly influenced by Caravaggio. He died in England in 1646.

Daughter: Artemisia Gentileschi (painter, b. 1590, d. 1642)


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