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St. Patrick

AKA Maewyn Succat

Born: 387 AD
Birthplace: Bannavem Taberniae, England
Died: 17-Mar-493 AD
Location of death: Saul, Ireland
Cause of death: Natural Causes
Remains: Buried, Down Cathedral, Downpatrick, Ireland

Gender: Male
Religion: Roman Catholic
Race or Ethnicity: White
Occupation: Religion

Nationality: Ireland
Executive summary: Patron saint of Ireland

The son of British Romans, Maewyn Succat was kidnapped by Irish marauders when he was 16 years of age, and enslaved to the Druid chieftain-priest Milchu. In his early 20s he escaped servitude, made his way to England and later France, and was ordained a priest and given a new name, Patrick. Charged by Pope Celestine I with saving Ireland from heresy and paganism, he returned to Ireland for decades of preaching, leading mass conversions of the Picts and Anglo-Saxons and constructing numerous new churches. He brought the Catholic Church some 350 new Bishops from among the Irish, converted and baptized the kings of Dublin and Munster along the majority of their subjects, and by his death virtually all of Ireland was Catholicized. Four of Patrick's disciples -- Auxilius, Beningnus, Fiaac, and Iserninus -- eventually followed him to sainthood.

According to folklore Patrick worked numerous miracles: He drove snakes from old Erin while shouting "Faugh-a-ballaugh!" ("Clear the way!"); was heckled for forty days on Holy Hill by hideous birds of prey, which he chased away by ringing a bell; and he wrestled with an angel, winning five concessions from God, including the duty to judge the entire Irish race come Judgment Day.

Father: Calphurnius (Roman military officer)
Mother: Conchessa

    Canonization

Author of books:
Confessio (450)
Letter to Coroticus



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