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Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (24-Sep-1986)

Director: John McNaughton

Writers: Richard Fire; John McNaughton

Keywords: True Crime, Rape, Serial Killer, Biography

NameOccupationBirthDeathKnown for
Michael Rooker
Actor
6-Apr-1955   Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer

REVIEWS

Review by Jouet Pour Chats (posted on 12-Feb-2005)

This film isn't conventional in any sense. At first glance, it is Yet Another Serial Killer movie but it manages to avoid most of the genre's cliches. This story is set in modern day America and stars Michael Rooker as a slow burning Henry Lee Lucas-alike. For a short time, he settles into a routine with his disgusting buddy Otis as they torture and murder their way through the day.

Thankfully, Henry isn't your typical movie serial killer. He's a distant loser instead of the overdone Hannibal Lector ripoff. Henry doesn't leave clues, taunt detectives or play cat and mouse. Fans of the horror genre simply must see this film for Henry and Otis' encounter with a sleazy television discounter. In very subtle ways, Otis (Tom Towles) steals some scenes. His character is a twitchy, middle-aged sleaze who hits on teenage boys and works at a gas station.

Henry is an ultraviolent movie with plenty of rape, random killing, blood everywhere and an ending that avoids all things Hollywood. It may not be possible to make an emotional connection with Henry but he can be viewed as a force of nature.


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