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Joseph Priestley

Joseph PriestleyBorn: 13-Mar-1733
Birthplace: Bristall Fieldhead, West Yorkshire, England
Died: 6-Feb-1804
Location of death: Northumberland, PA
Cause of death: unspecified
Remains: Buried, Riverview Cemetery, Northumberland, PA

Gender: Male
Religion: Unitarian
Race or Ethnicity: White
Sexual orientation: Straight
Occupation: Chemist

Nationality: England
Executive summary: Investigated gases, discovered Oxygen

Preacher and chemist Joseph Priestley is generally credited with discovering oxygen (he called it "dephlogisticated air"), and more conclusively discovered carbon dioxide. He proved that plants absorb carbon dioxide and release oxygen, and invented soda pop by dissolving carbon dioxide into water to make fizzy carbonated water.

Wife: Mary Wilkinson (m. 1762, one daughter, three sons)

    University: Dissenting Academy, Daventry, Northamptonshire
    Professor: New College, Oxford University

    American Philosophical Society 1785
    Royal Society 1766
    Lunar Society
    Copley Medal 1772

Author of books:
Theory of Language and Universal Grammar (1762)
An Essay on a Course of Liberal Education for Civil and Active Life (1765)
The History and Present State of Electricity, with Original Experiments (1767)
An Essay on the First Principles of Government (1768)
Experiments and Observations on Different Kinds of Air (1772-90, 6 vols.)
Institutes of Natural and Revealed Religion (177274, religion)
An History of the Corruptions of Christianity (1782, religion)
Lectures on History and General Policy (1788)
Letters to the Right Honourable Edmund Burke (1791)
Letters to the Inhabitants of Northumberland (1799)

Appears on postage stamps:
USA, Scott #2038 (20 cents, issued 13-Apr-1983)


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Chemistry
Gas
Oxygen


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