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Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (12-Sep-1990)

Director: Tom Stoppard

Writer: Tom Stoppard

From a play: Hamlet by William Shakespeare

Music by: Stanley Myers

Producers: Michael Brandman; Emanuel Azenberg

Keywords: Comedy

NameOccupationBirthDeathKnown for
Richard Dreyfuss
Actor
29-Oct-1947   Close Encounters of the Third Kind
Iain Glen
Actor
24-Jun-1961   Resident Evil: Apocalypse
Gary Oldman
Actor
21-Mar-1958   Sid Vicious in Sid and Nancy
Ian Richardson
Actor
7-Apr-1934 9-Feb-2007 House of Cards
Tim Roth
Actor
14-May-1961   Pulp Fiction

CAST

Gary Oldman   ...   Rosencrantz
Tim Roth   ...   Guildenstern
Richard Dreyfuss   ...   The Player
Iain Glen   ...   Hamlet
Ian Richardson   ...   Polonius
Donald Sumpter   ...   Claudius
Joanna Miles   ...   Gertrude
Joanna Roth   ...   Ophelia
John Burgess   ...   Ambassador from England
Tragedians
Livio Badurina   ...   Tragedian
Tomislav Maretic   ...   Tragedian
Mare Mlacnik   ...   Tragedian
Srdjan Soric   ...   Tragedian
Mladen Vasary   ...   Tragedian
Zeljko Vukmirica   ...   Tragedian
Branko Zavrsan   ...   Tragedian
Ljubo Zecevic   ...   Osric
Sven Medvesek   ...   Laertes
Vili Matula   ...   Horatio

REVIEWS

Review by Roy Speed (posted on 31-Mar-2005)

A remarkable film, and for a number of reasons. First, it's Tom Stoppard directing his own play, which is itself an unusually fine piece of writing. Second, it's unusual for a filmed play to burst so completely out of the confines of the stage -- it doesn't feel stagey at all. Third, it's funny -- really funny -- and clever-funny (as opposed to stupid-funny), so brilliant that it's thrilling. The concept is simple but clever: The principals in this story are two minor characters in Shakespeare's Hamlet, most of what we're watching is just offstage from the main events in Shakespeare's play.

Gary Oldman and Tim Roth were both quite young and have never been better. Best scene: the game of questions, played in a medieval tennis court.


Review by anonymous (posted on 31-Mar-2005)

A remarkable film, and for a number of reasons. First, it's Tom Stoppard directing his own play, which is an unusually fine piece of writing. Second, it's unusual for a filmed play to burst so completely out the confines of the stage -- it doesn't feel stagey at all. Third, it's funny -- really funny -- and clever-funny (as opposed to stupid-funny), so brilliant that it's thrilling. The concept is simple but clever: The principals in this story are two minor characters in Shakespeare's Hamlet, most of what we're watching is just offstage from the main events in Shakespeare's play. Gary Oldman and Tim Roth were both quite young and have never been better. Best scene: the game of questions, played in a medieval tennis court.


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