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William Bayliss

William BaylissAKA William Maddock Bayliss

Born: 2-May-1860
Birthplace: Wolverhampton, Staffordshire, England
Died: 27-Aug-1924
Location of death: London, England
Cause of death: unspecified

Gender: Male
Race or Ethnicity: White
Sexual orientation: Straight
Occupation: Doctor

Nationality: England
Executive summary: Co-Discovered hormones

Collaborator with Ernest Starling, the two of them discovering the peristaltic wave, contractions within the digestive tract to move food forward through the system. They also discovered in 1902 the hormone secretin which causes the pancreas to secrete juices for the aid of digestion. He also demonstrated the function of the intestinal enzyme trypsin. Experiments on animals brought the wrath of anti-vivisectionists, culminating in the "Brown Dog Affair" in 1903. A lawsuit by Bayless resulted in his vindication (as no live vivisection had occurred), winning a 2,000 award which he donated to the University. His 1915 work Principles of General Physiology served as a standard text for many years, going through four editions.

Father: Moses Bayliss (bolt manufacturer)
Mother: Jane Maddock
Wife: Gertrude Starling (three sons, one daughter)
Son: Leonard Ernest Bayliss (physiologist)

    High School: Mowbray House School, Wolverhampton
    University: University College London (1881-84)
    University: Wadham College, Oxford University
    Professor: University College London (1888-1912)
    Professor: General Physiology, University College London (1912-24)

    Royal Medal 1911
    Copley Medal 1919
    Knighthood 1922
    Royal Society 1903

Author of books:
The Nature of Enzyme Action (1908, physiology)
Principles of General Physiology (1915, physiology)
The Vaso-Motor System (1923, physiology)


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