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Wayne C. Booth

Wayne C. BoothAKA Wayne Clayson Booth

Born: 22-Feb-1921
Birthplace: American Fork, UT
Died: 10-Oct-2005
Location of death: Chicago, IL
Cause of death: unspecified

Gender: Male
Race or Ethnicity: White
Sexual orientation: Straight
Occupation: Critic

Nationality: United States
Executive summary: The Rhetoric of Fiction

Military service: US Army (WWII)

Father: Wayne Chipman Booth
Mother: Lillian
Sister: Lucille (younger)
Wife: Phyllis Barnes (psychologist, m. 1946, one son, two daughters)
Son: John Richard Booth (d. age 18 automobile accident)
Daughter: Katherine Booth Stevens
Daughter: Alison Booth

    University: BA, Brigham Young University (1944)
    University: MA, University of Chicago (1947)
    University: PhD, University of Chicago (1950)
    Professor: Haverford College
    Professor: Earlham College
    Professor: University of Chicago (1962-92)

    American Academy of Arts and Sciences
    Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee
    Modern Language Association President (1981-82)
    MoveOn.org
    Guggenheim Fellowship
    NEA Fellowship
    Ford Fellowship

Author of books:
The Rhetoric of Fiction (1961)
Now Don't Try to Reason with Me: Essays and Ironies for a Credulous Age (1970)
Modern Dogma and the Rhetoric of Assent (1974)
A Rhetoric of Irony (1974)
Critical Understanding: The Powers and Limits of Pluralism (1979)
The Company We Keep (1988)
The Vocation of a Teacher: Rhetorical Occasions, 1967-1988 (1988)
The Art of Deliberalizing: A Handbook for True Professionals (1990)
For the Love of It: Amateuring & Its Rivals (1999)
The Rhetoric of Rhetoric: The Quest for Effective Communication (2004)


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