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William Scholl

AKA William Mathias Scholl

Born: 22-Jun-1882
Birthplace: La Porte, IN
Died: 29-Mar-1968
Location of death: Chicago, IL
Cause of death: Natural Causes

Gender: Male
Religion: Lutheran
Race or Ethnicity: White
Occupation: Business

Nationality: United States
Executive summary: Dr Scholl's shoe pads

William Scholl began peddling his arch supports in 1904, while he was still attending medical school and working as a shoe salesman. He led a nationwide campaign for standardized shoe sizes (accomplished in 1905), cajoled shoemakers to manufacture a greater selection of widths than merely "wide" and "narrow", and he was among the first retailers to sell shoes of different sizes in pairs for people whose left and right feet are of unmatched lengths or widths. He eventually sold plasters, powders, and pads, and from the 1930s to the '60s he had a nationwide chain of Dr. Scholl's Foot Comfort Shops. The stores are long gone, but Dr Scholl, who never married, remains the namesake of corn pads, medicated disks, bunion pads, arch supports, and shoe insoles. He was the founder of the Illinois College of Chiropody and Orthopedics, now known as the Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine and part of the Chicago's Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science.

Father: (dairy farmer)
Brother: Frank Scholl (Scholl company executive, b. circa 1884, d. 1967)

    Medical School: MD, University of Illinois (1904)

    Scholl Manufacturing Company Founder & President (1907-68)
    German Ancestry

Author of books:
The Human Foot: Anatomy, Physiology, Mechanics, Deformities and Treatment (1915)
Practipedics: The Science of Giving Foot Comfort and Correcting the Cause of Foot and Shoe Troubles (1917)
Treatment and Care of the Feet (1930)
Podology: Based on the Experience, Inventions, Foot Comfort System and Methods of Dr. William M. Scholl (1932)



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